E theses online service thesis

Finding Other Theses and Dissertations

ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global (All records)
“ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global is the world’s most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses from around the world, spanning from 1743 to the present day and offering full text for graduate works added since 1997, along with selected full text for works written prior to 1997. It contains a significant amount of new international dissertations and theses both in citations and in full text.”

Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD)
Browse or search through several ETD collections, typically across multiple institutions at once, or take advantage of the NDLTD Global ETD Search.

WorldCat dissertations and theses
Provides access to over 5 million records of dissertations and theses available in OCLC member libraries catalogs in the WorldCat database.

Center for Research Libraries foreign dissertations
More than 750,000 dissertations produced for universities outside of the United States and Canada. UF researchers have free use of the CRL collections through interlibrary loan .

Theses Canada Portal
Launched in 1965 at the request of the deans of Canadian graduate schools, this portal is a collaborative program between Library and Archives Canada (LAC) and nearly 70 universities accredited by Universities Canada.

ProQuest Dissertations and Theses – UK & Ireland
A comprehensive listing of theses with abstracts accepted for higher degrees by universities in Great Britain and Ireland since 1716. Also known as the Index to Theses

EThOS – British Library eThesis Online Service
EThOS is the UK’s national thesis service which aims to maximize the visibility and availability of the UK’s doctoral research theses. There are approximately 400,000 records relating to theses awarded by over 120 institutions. Around 160,000 of these also provide access to the full text thesis, either via download from the EThOS database or via links to the institution’s own repository.

Open Access Theses and Dissertations
Metadata and links to open access graduate theses and dissertations from over 1,100 colleges, universities and research institutions.

Registry of Open Access Repositories (ROAR)
Access to research literature pre- and post-peer-review through author self-archiving in institutional eprint archives.

Purchase a copy through ProQuest
Purchase unbound copies of dissertations and theses with express delivery to your home, school or office. Select from the over 1.9 million graduate works available.

Contact the author
If you are looking for a specific thesis or dissertation, and you cannot find it using any resources above, you can attempt to contact the author or the issuing institution/department.

Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD)

The Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) application is used by Stanford students for the submission of PhD dissertations and Engineering Masters Theses.

ETDs at Stanford is a joint initiative involving Stanford Libraries and the Office of the University Registrar that launched in Fall 2009. Teams from both organizations support the program, with policies, workflows and software, to enable the submission, processing, online availability, and preservation of theses and dissertations in digital form produced by Stanford students. University IT’s Administrative Services is a third partner who oversees PeopleSoft/Axess integration points with the ETD application.

The Office of the Registrar supports students by providing documentation available online to reduce the need for in-person assistance. The streamlined submission process saves time for the Registrar and students alike, and reduces environmental impact by eliminating the need to print multiple paper copies for binding, or even more copies when last-minute corrections are required.

All PhD and Engineering Master’s student submissions are published in the Stanford Digital Repository and available for access in SearchWorks.

Features

  • Easy-to-use system for uploading dissertation PDF, supplemental files and permission files as necessary
  • Option to create a dissertation abstract to greatly enhance online discoverability
  • Optional licenses available for selection as desired
  • Option to embargo the publication (delay the release) for up to 2 years from time of deposit, in the following increments: 6 months, 1 year, 2 years
  • Workflow provides for online review and approval by readers, primary advisor and University Registrar staff
  • Each deposited dissertation is published at a persistent URL (PURL) where it can be cited and reliably accessed now and into the future
  • Each deposited dissertation is added to the library catalog, SearchWorks, where it can be discovered along with other works by Stanford students and faculty
  • The descriptive metadata for each deposited dissertation is provided to OCLC WorldCat, a comprehensive world-wide database about library collections (dissertation PDFs and supplemental files are made available once any embargo has been lifted)

Available to

Stanford students, for the submission of PhD dissertations and Engineering Masters Theses only (includes: Ph.D., J.S.D., D.M.A. and Engineer degrees).

Requirements

Students must have applied to graduate, and be prepared to complete the follow-on tasks listed in Axess in the academic quarter that they plan to submit their dissertation.

Data security

The SDR allows deposit of low risk and medium risk information as defined by the Information Security Office. Note that ETD deposits to the SDR are subject to the Stanford University Thesis & Dissertation Publication License.

Rates

Get started

Complete the checklist in Axess during the quarter in which graduation is planned. Once completed, the ETD submission interface is enabled in each student’s Axess account. Then, refer to How to Use the eDissertation/eThesis Center. The submission portal opens on the first day of instruction each quarter.

About: E-Theses Online Service

E-Theses Online Service (EThOS) is a bibliographic database and union catalogue of electronic theses provided by the British Library, the National Library of the United Kingdom. As of March 2018 EThOS provides access to approximately 480,000 doctoral theses awarded by over 140 UK higher education institutions, with around 3000 new thesis records added every month.

  • E-Theses Online Service (EThOS) is a bibliographic database and union catalogue of electronic theses provided by the British Library, the National Library of the United Kingdom. As of March 2018 EThOS provides access to approximately 480,000 doctoral theses awarded by over 140 UK higher education institutions, with around 3000 new thesis records added every month. (en)
  • E-Theses Online Service, kurz EThOS, ist eine bibliografische Datenbank für wissenschaftliche Arbeiten. Der Dienst wird getragen durch die British Library, die Nationalbibliothek des Vereinigten Königreichs. (de)
  • 电子论文在线服务(英語:E-Theses Online Service,简称EThOS),是由大英图书馆,英国国家图书馆提供的电子论文数据库和联合目录。截至2018年3月,EThOS可以访问由140多家英国高等教育机构发布的约480,000篇博士论文,每月增加大约3000篇新论文记录。EThOS记录论文数据和元数据,可以使用基本和高级搜索词进行搜索。 (zh)
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  • E-Theses Online Service (EThOS) is a bibliographic database and union catalogue of electronic theses provided by the British Library, the National Library of the United Kingdom. As of March 2018 EThOS provides access to approximately 480,000 doctoral theses awarded by over 140 UK higher education institutions, with around 3000 new thesis records added every month. (en)
  • E-Theses Online Service, kurz EThOS, ist eine bibliografische Datenbank für wissenschaftliche Arbeiten. Der Dienst wird getragen durch die British Library, die Nationalbibliothek des Vereinigten Königreichs. (de)
  • 电子论文在线服务(英語:E-Theses Online Service,简称EThOS),是由大英图书馆,英国国家图书馆提供的电子论文数据库和联合目录。截至2018年3月,EThOS可以访问由140多家英国高等教育机构发布的约480,000篇博士论文,每月增加大约3000篇新论文记录。EThOS记录论文数据和元数据,可以使用基本和高级搜索词进行搜索。 (zh)
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  • E-Theses Online Service (en)
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E theses online service thesis

Theses

Description

  • Thesis Search
  • Collection
  • Theses @HKU
  • Relevant Links
  • Retrospective Conversion of Print Theses

Browse

Filters

About the collection:

The Hong Kong University Theses Collection holds theses and dissertations submitted for higher degrees to the University of Hong Kong since 1941. The first recorded thesis was dated 1928, though all theses prior to 1941 were lost during the occupation of WWII. The HKU Scholars Hub includes theses in the arts, humanities, education and the social, medical and natural sciences. Many of them deal entirely with or focus on subjects relating to Hong Kong. The collection is primarily in English, with some in English and Chinese, and others in Chinese only. Almost all existing HKU theses are included in the HKU Scholars Hub. Missing older ones might still be located in HKU departmental libraries. As of 2006, HKUTO began to include some theses done by the HKU School of Professional and Continuing Education (SPACE).

Electronic Theses & Dissertations (ETDs):

The University Libraries began in 1996 to place HKU ETDs online. In 2000, The HKU Senate made new policy requiring new Research Postgraduate (rpg) students entering after 1 Jan 2001 to create an ETD and be placed online in the Libraries servers in open access. Almost all other thesis producing HKU degrees now (2011) require the same. From Dec 2010, only rpg theses are collected both in print and ETD. For other degrees, only ETDs are collected. A retrospective digitization project on older theses was completed in 2010.

Printed Thesis Access:

The original hardcopy of the Theses Collection is housed in the University Archives and does not circulate. All print theses are housed in off campus University Archives storage and must be ordered for you by the archivists. Please contact the University Archives by email at hkua@hkucc.hku.hk to request one or more theses for your research and please give the author, title, year, and call number of the theses you wish to consult. They will contact you as soon as they are available for you. Viewing must be done in the University Archives. You may also reach the Archive by telephone at (852) 2219-4191. Occasionally, an author may restrict access to his or her thesis for a limited period of time and it will not be available right away, or not available on line in the HKU Scholars Hub.

If you cannot download copies of the pages you need from the HKU Scholars Hub and wish to have copies made by the Archivists you may request the Archives to do the copying for a small fee, provided that the author has no restrictions on copying the work. They restrict the copy orders to 1/3 or less of the entire thesis and you are required to cite the thesis properly in your work including: the author, the title, date of publication, courtesy of the University Archives, University of Hong Kong.

Resources to support your thesis writing

Endnote@HKU: A bibliographic software to organize your references and cite while you write

Turnitin@HKU: A text matching software for originality checking

ETD@HKU: Submitting and creating your electronic thesis

Other ETD Initiatives

Finding Australian Theses: Full text to postgraduate theses at Australian universities

DART-Europe E-theses Portal: Full text research theses from 11 European countries

DSpace@MIT: Full text to over 20,000 MIT Theses

Digital Dissertation Consortium: Full text to over 106,616 dissertations from the ProQuest subscribed by HKUL (HKU only)

DissOnline: Full text to doctoral dissertations and theses from German universities

DiVA: the Academic Archive Online: Full text to doctoral and masters dissertations and other academic reports from universities in Scandinavia (mainly Sweden and Norway)

E-thesis Electronic Publication at the University of Helsinki: Doctoral dissertations and other publications from the University of Helsinki.

Electronic theses and dissertations Taiwan: Abstracts to doctoral dissertations at the universities in Taiwan from 1994 onwards.

Ethos : Electronic Theses Online Service: British Library’s online thesis service

HKLIS — Dissertations and Theses Collection (DTC): Doctoral and masters dissertations and theses at the university libraries in Hong Kong. Full text access is available from University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Lingnan University.

Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations: Electronic theses and dissertations for over 90 universities.

OpenThesis: OpenThesis is a free repository of theses, dissertations, and other academic documents.

Pennsylvania State University’s electronic Theses and Dissertations Archives: Abstract to Penn State electronic theses and dissertations.

Proquest Digital Dissertations (PQDD): Index and abstract to international dissertations from 1861 for more than 1000 universities. Some carry full text. (HKU Only)

Theses Canada Portal: This site is maintained by the National Library of Canada offering access to theses submitted to Canadian universities. .

Retrospective Conversion of Print Theses

Please note that most HKU postgraduate programs require students to now produce electronic theses. Please see Theses at HKU for a description of this procedure, and the thesis submission form for the regulations concerning them.

However the great majority of postgraduate students graduated without these new requirements. The paragraphs below describe the digitization of these theses.

Most graduate programs at HKU began to require electronic theses from their students from 2001*. Usage statistics in 2004 showed that electronic theses were receiving 400 times more usage than the printed theses. In order to further unlock this hidden treasure, we searched out postal and email addresses of our post-graduate alumni, who had written theses before this new electronic requirement, and wrote to them in 2004/05 asking for their permission to digitize their printed theses. We received 1,000s of positive replies, and a handful of negative ones. Some even sent us the original source files, so that we could convert and make text-embedded PDF files. We have now (June 2011) finished retrospective digitization of all HKU theses deposited in the HKU Libraries.

Most thesis authors are very happy to find their thesis online now. Whereas printed theses were rarely found and read, the online theses are indexed in many worldwide search engines, such as Google and Yahoo, and can be found and read by anyone around the world. Potential employers and scholarly collaborators can easily find, read and cite them.

However, some thesis authors, for their own reasons do not wish to allow online access. If this is the case for you, could you please send us a copy of your HKU Library card, or a copy of some other form of identification, and we will remove access to the online thesis. Could you please send this to libetd@hku.hk, or to,

  • Cataloguing Department
  • HKU Libraries
  • Pokfulam Road
  • Hong Kong

The letter that went out to thesis authors asking their consent for digitization, wrote that, “If we don’t hear anything from you we will assume that you approve. However, should you decide at a future time that you do not want your thesis included, simply notify us in writing and we will immediately remove it from the database.”

* Please note that if you entered a HKU postgraduate program requiring an e-thesis, you should follow instructions in the Submission Form for your degree if you wish it to be restricted.

E theses online service thesis

Electronic Theses & Dissertations

An Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD) is simply the digital (electronic) representation of your thesis or dissertation. It is the same as its paper counterpart in content and organization, and it meets the formatting requirements described in A Student Guide to Preparing Electronic Theses and Dissertations . You already have created an ETD if you have written your thesis or dissertation on a computer by using a word processing program.

UA ETD implementation is a joint effort of the Graduate School, ProQuest/UMI, and the University Libraries. The Graduate School�s ETD site is where you find general information on ETDs at UA, and the ProQuest (PQ) site is where you will practice ETD submission and then make the final submission. The role of UA Libraries is to provide access and long-term archiving of ETDs.

ETD submission began as optional on 26-Feb-09. It became required for all thesis and dissertation submissions as of 15-Aug-09.

NOTE: There are 2 important ETD websites.

  1. The UA site where you are now has general ETD information that you should review first.
  2. The ProQuest (PQ) site is where you go next. Here you find detailed information on PQ guidelines on formatting for digital submission, publishing, copyrighting, binding, etc. You also can practice ETD submission and make the final submission.

Advantages of ETD:

Rather than printing your manuscript dozens of times as you make changes and progress through the various stages of review, you will be able simply to make corrections to the electronic file, convert the final version to a PDF file, and submit that file.

You may include additional information (e.g., data or multimedia files) that may not be possible or appropriate to incorporate into a paper document. Such files typically are included, however, only if they are an integral part of the thesis or dissertation.

Whereas paper copies can spend months waiting to be bound and distributed, your electronic document can be available much more quickly and, if you so choose, to a much wider audience.

You may be able to reduce or eliminate the costs of printing and binding. Committee members may still, if they choose, require a paper copy for their part of the review process and/or for departmental archives.

It is important to recognize the distinction between electronic submission and electronic publication.

Electronic submission means simply that rather than printing your thesis or dissertation and submitting paper copies to the Graduate School, you will submit your final document electronically as a PDF file.

Electronic publication refers to the ways in which your electronic thesis or dissertation will be made available to others. For further discussion, visit Publishing Your Electronic Thesis or Dissertation and Copyright Information for Your Thesis or Dissertation .

Publishing Your Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

ProQuest notifies the Graduate School when you submit your ETD at the PQ site. Once approved by the Graduate School, your ETD is published by ProQuest/UMI and UA Libraries .

There are two alternative ways to publish–traditional publishing or open access publishing–with a further option to place an embargo (i.e., time delay) on the release of your ETD into the public domain.

What is traditional publishing, and what are the benefits?

Traditional publishing means that your thesis or dissertation is listed in an online database; however, access to the full manuscript is available only to authorized PQ users by paid subscription. Other users have access to only an extract consisting of the title page and the first few content pages. Traditional publishing is a less-expensive option and makes it possible to earn royalties. See the PQ site for details.

What is open access publishing, and what are the benefits?

Open Access Publishing means the full text of your electronic thesis or dissertation is freely accessible world-wide on the Internet after the committee�s final approval and your subsequent submission of the ETD. Granting open access to your ETD results in more recognition of your research work, wider dissemination of scholarly information, and acceleration of research. For more information on open access, read Open Access: Open the Channels of Communication in Your Field published by the Association of College & Research Libraries.

You can choose to grant immediate access to your ETD world-wide on the Internet or to block access to protect the work for patent and/or proprietary purposes for a designated period. Open access to your ETD is automatic after the designated time.

Publishers of some professional journals (e.g., Elsevier) have made the decision that theses or dissertations that are available online, even those with world-wide availability, do not qualify as prior publication and therefore do not deter later publication. However, other publishers (e.g., the American Physiological Society) have reached the opposite conclusion.

Disclosing potential intellectual property in theses or dissertations published online may preclude patent rights in some areas of the world. If you have patent concerns or concerns that the electronic posting of your ETD might prevent later acceptance of your research by professional journals or book publishers, it is your responsibility to consult with your committee and with possible future publishers to make an informed decision. Most professional journals publish Instructions for Authors on their web site where they specifically address this issue. Some journals, however, do not. Many journals state that their policy is to deal with each submission on a case-by-case basis. To clarify the policies of a particular journal, you may need to contact the publisher.

Publishing Your ETD with ProQuest/UMI

All master�s and doctoral students submitting an ETD must sign an agreement with ProQuest/UMI Dissertation Publishing . This is completed and electronically signed as part of your on-line submission through ProQuest.

ProQuest is a private company that has acted for more than 60 years as the publisher and distributor for the majority of theses and dissertations written in the United States. Published theses and dissertations are listed in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) database . Online access to the available full text of theses and dissertations (including those written at UA) is through paid institutional subscription.

It is important that you read and understand the ramifications of the Proquest/UMI agreement and any other publishing agreement that you may be asked to sign. To make informed decisions, you, your faculty advisor, and your committee should be aware of the publication practices in your field of study, particularly if you have previously published or plan to publish any part of your research in a journal or book. An example of the agreement can be viewed at the ProQuest website (agreement)

The ProQuest/UMI Publication Agreement

A copy of each UA thesis and dissertation is sent to PQ, where a digital copy is stored both in the PQ archives and in the Library of Congress. Any researcher can locate your document through a subject, author, or keyword search; read your abstract; and preview the first few pages of your dissertation. In addition, unless you specifically indicate otherwise in the publication agreement that you will be required to sign, your document also may be purchased by anyone as a download or as a bound copy. PQ pays you royalties on those sales at the rate of 10% for any year in which the amount totals $10 or more.

Access to full-text ETDs in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Database is through paid subscription. Once a student or faculty member is no longer affiliated with UA, he or she would lose the access unless affiliated with another organization that has a PQ subscription.

Read Publishing Your Graduate Work with UMI Dissertation Publishing very carefully before signing this agreement. You will find important information on copyright there as well.

Publishing Your ETD with UA Libraries

All master�s and doctoral students submitting a thesis or dissertation to the UA Graduate School must sign the UA Publication Form for Electronic Thesis or Dissertation . This is completed and electronically signed as part of your on-line submission through ProQuest.

The Libraries provide free, long-term, full-text access to UA ETDs on and off campus through the Libraries Digital Collections Depositing ETDs with the Libraries for open access is at no cost to graduate students. The Libraries receive a copy of the PDF file for access and archiving once the thesis or dissertation is submitted and approved by the Graduate School.

You may choose to embargo (i.e., restrict access to) your work for six months, one year, or two years; beginning with ETDs submitted for Fall 2011 commencement, there also is a 5-year option. If you embargo, only the citation information will appear in the library databases until the designated embargo period has ended. Decide with your advisor whether or not to embargo.

TIP: Back up your work!

We recommend that each day you work on your thesis or dissertation, you save your document under a brief name that ends with the current date. For example, “Ch One 24-Mar-2012”, then tomorrow, “Ch One 25-Mar-2012” You will have a chronological archive of your work in case you make an inadvertent change or even lose the file on which you are currently working. It�s well worth the expense of buying removable media such flash drives, zip disks or CDs. It�s also a good idea to have copies in multiple places. Keep one in your bag, one in your drawer at home, and one somewhere safe in your department. It takes a bit more time, but sensible backup procedures can save you from a lot of heartbreak and many hours of lost time down the road.

E theses online service thesis

Masters and Doctoral theses and dissertations submitted for degree purposes at Rhodes, have been digitised and made accessible on the Rhodes Digital Commons

We acknowledge that not all theses and dissertations submitted for degree purposes have been submitted to the Library as per the University’s rules and regulations. Should a thesis or dissertation not be on the repository, please contact us.

Any queries in this regard can be submitted to digitalcommons@ru.ac.za

The copyright of a thesis resides with the author. A thesis may be consulted for research purposes only, and any reference to its contents must be duly acknowledged.

Information for authors

The electronic copy submitted must be accompanied by the Thesis Final Submission Form‌ (to be completed by candidates and supervisors)

After the examination process has been completed, the candidate is required to submit an electronic version (CD/DVD) of the final corrected thesis in PDF format for depositing in Rhodes University Digital Commons

Candidates and supervisors who would like a digital holding period/embargo of between 1 and 2 years before deposit in the digital repository must request this in the Thesis Final Submission Form.

File Format

Electronic versions are submitted in PDF format. Supplementary material, such as images, sound files, video clips and data files, may be submitted in other formats. Electronic theses may be submitted as single files or split into several files. If multiple files are submitted, please include a table of file contents to indicate the sequence.

Candidates should check

(1) that the electronic copy submitted are the full and final version of their thesis, i.e. the same as the final copy approved by the examiners;

(2) the disk(s) for corruption.

Copyright

Candidates should certify that, if appropriate, they have obtained and attached a written permission statement from the owner(s) of any third-party copyrighted material in the thesis, for example visual images. Candidates must undertake to be bound by Rule G 71 of the University’s General Rules for Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates:“If, at the date of the presentation, the thesis has not been published in a manner satisfactory to the Senate, the University shall have the right to make copies of the thesis from time to time, for deposit in other universities or research libraries, make additional copies of it, in whole or in part from time to time and distribute the content in whatever format it deems fit, for the purposes of research. The University may, for any reason, either at the request of the candidate or on its own initiative, waive its rights.

South African ETD Collections

IRSpace (a federated search engine which searches across all South African research repositories)

E theses online service thesis

Electronic Theses & Dissertations

An Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD) is simply the digital (electronic) representation of your thesis or dissertation. It is the same as its paper counterpart in content and organization, and it meets the formatting requirements described in A Student Guide to Preparing Electronic Theses and Dissertations . You already have created an ETD if you have written your thesis or dissertation on a computer by using a word processing program.

UA ETD implementation is a joint effort of the Graduate School, ProQuest/UMI, and the University Libraries. The Graduate School�s ETD site is where you find general information on ETDs at UA, and the ProQuest (PQ) site is where you will practice ETD submission and then make the final submission. The role of UA Libraries is to provide access and long-term archiving of ETDs.

ETD submission began as optional on 26-Feb-09. It became required for all thesis and dissertation submissions as of 15-Aug-09.

NOTE: There are 2 important ETD websites.

  1. The UA site where you are now has general ETD information that you should review first.
  2. The ProQuest (PQ) site is where you go next. Here you find detailed information on PQ guidelines on formatting for digital submission, publishing, copyrighting, binding, etc. You also can practice ETD submission and make the final submission.

Advantages of ETD:

Rather than printing your manuscript dozens of times as you make changes and progress through the various stages of review, you will be able simply to make corrections to the electronic file, convert the final version to a PDF file, and submit that file.

You may include additional information (e.g., data or multimedia files) that may not be possible or appropriate to incorporate into a paper document. Such files typically are included, however, only if they are an integral part of the thesis or dissertation.

Whereas paper copies can spend months waiting to be bound and distributed, your electronic document can be available much more quickly and, if you so choose, to a much wider audience.

You may be able to reduce or eliminate the costs of printing and binding. Committee members may still, if they choose, require a paper copy for their part of the review process and/or for departmental archives.

It is important to recognize the distinction between electronic submission and electronic publication.

Electronic submission means simply that rather than printing your thesis or dissertation and submitting paper copies to the Graduate School, you will submit your final document electronically as a PDF file.

Electronic publication refers to the ways in which your electronic thesis or dissertation will be made available to others. For further discussion, visit Publishing Your Electronic Thesis or Dissertation and Copyright Information for Your Thesis or Dissertation .

Publishing Your Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

ProQuest notifies the Graduate School when you submit your ETD at the PQ site. Once approved by the Graduate School, your ETD is published by ProQuest/UMI and UA Libraries .

There are two alternative ways to publish–traditional publishing or open access publishing–with a further option to place an embargo (i.e., time delay) on the release of your ETD into the public domain.

What is traditional publishing, and what are the benefits?

Traditional publishing means that your thesis or dissertation is listed in an online database; however, access to the full manuscript is available only to authorized PQ users by paid subscription. Other users have access to only an extract consisting of the title page and the first few content pages. Traditional publishing is a less-expensive option and makes it possible to earn royalties. See the PQ site for details.

What is open access publishing, and what are the benefits?

Open Access Publishing means the full text of your electronic thesis or dissertation is freely accessible world-wide on the Internet after the committee�s final approval and your subsequent submission of the ETD. Granting open access to your ETD results in more recognition of your research work, wider dissemination of scholarly information, and acceleration of research. For more information on open access, read Open Access: Open the Channels of Communication in Your Field published by the Association of College & Research Libraries.

You can choose to grant immediate access to your ETD world-wide on the Internet or to block access to protect the work for patent and/or proprietary purposes for a designated period. Open access to your ETD is automatic after the designated time.

Publishers of some professional journals (e.g., Elsevier) have made the decision that theses or dissertations that are available online, even those with world-wide availability, do not qualify as prior publication and therefore do not deter later publication. However, other publishers (e.g., the American Physiological Society) have reached the opposite conclusion.

Disclosing potential intellectual property in theses or dissertations published online may preclude patent rights in some areas of the world. If you have patent concerns or concerns that the electronic posting of your ETD might prevent later acceptance of your research by professional journals or book publishers, it is your responsibility to consult with your committee and with possible future publishers to make an informed decision. Most professional journals publish Instructions for Authors on their web site where they specifically address this issue. Some journals, however, do not. Many journals state that their policy is to deal with each submission on a case-by-case basis. To clarify the policies of a particular journal, you may need to contact the publisher.

Publishing Your ETD with ProQuest/UMI

All master�s and doctoral students submitting an ETD must sign an agreement with ProQuest/UMI Dissertation Publishing . This is completed and electronically signed as part of your on-line submission through ProQuest.

ProQuest is a private company that has acted for more than 60 years as the publisher and distributor for the majority of theses and dissertations written in the United States. Published theses and dissertations are listed in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) database . Online access to the available full text of theses and dissertations (including those written at UA) is through paid institutional subscription.

It is important that you read and understand the ramifications of the Proquest/UMI agreement and any other publishing agreement that you may be asked to sign. To make informed decisions, you, your faculty advisor, and your committee should be aware of the publication practices in your field of study, particularly if you have previously published or plan to publish any part of your research in a journal or book. An example of the agreement can be viewed at the ProQuest website (agreement)

The ProQuest/UMI Publication Agreement

A copy of each UA thesis and dissertation is sent to PQ, where a digital copy is stored both in the PQ archives and in the Library of Congress. Any researcher can locate your document through a subject, author, or keyword search; read your abstract; and preview the first few pages of your dissertation. In addition, unless you specifically indicate otherwise in the publication agreement that you will be required to sign, your document also may be purchased by anyone as a download or as a bound copy. PQ pays you royalties on those sales at the rate of 10% for any year in which the amount totals $10 or more.

Access to full-text ETDs in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Database is through paid subscription. Once a student or faculty member is no longer affiliated with UA, he or she would lose the access unless affiliated with another organization that has a PQ subscription.

Read Publishing Your Graduate Work with UMI Dissertation Publishing very carefully before signing this agreement. You will find important information on copyright there as well.

Publishing Your ETD with UA Libraries

All master�s and doctoral students submitting a thesis or dissertation to the UA Graduate School must sign the UA Publication Form for Electronic Thesis or Dissertation . This is completed and electronically signed as part of your on-line submission through ProQuest.

The Libraries provide free, long-term, full-text access to UA ETDs on and off campus through the Libraries Digital Collections Depositing ETDs with the Libraries for open access is at no cost to graduate students. The Libraries receive a copy of the PDF file for access and archiving once the thesis or dissertation is submitted and approved by the Graduate School.

You may choose to embargo (i.e., restrict access to) your work for six months, one year, or two years; beginning with ETDs submitted for Fall 2011 commencement, there also is a 5-year option. If you embargo, only the citation information will appear in the library databases until the designated embargo period has ended. Decide with your advisor whether or not to embargo.

TIP: Back up your work!

We recommend that each day you work on your thesis or dissertation, you save your document under a brief name that ends with the current date. For example, “Ch One 24-Mar-2012”, then tomorrow, “Ch One 25-Mar-2012” You will have a chronological archive of your work in case you make an inadvertent change or even lose the file on which you are currently working. It�s well worth the expense of buying removable media such flash drives, zip disks or CDs. It�s also a good idea to have copies in multiple places. Keep one in your bag, one in your drawer at home, and one somewhere safe in your department. It takes a bit more time, but sensible backup procedures can save you from a lot of heartbreak and many hours of lost time down the road.

Library

Reed’s digital repository for senior and MALS theses. The archive—of voluntary submissions—originated from a Reed Students for Free Culture proposal in 2007.

How to contribute to the etheses archive

Current students can opt in to the ethesis archive during the final library submission.

All alumni can contribute to the archive, but the process to do so depends on your graduation year.

If you graduated after 1992, you can use our Online Submission Portal, but will need a Kerberos account to do so. Instructions on setting one up are available on the Alumni Programs website.

If you graduated in 1992 or before, please email a PDF copy of your thesis to etheses@groups.reed.edu. After receiving your thesis we will send you a permissions form to fill out and return. Unfortunately, we cannot scan theses at this time. Please check back.

Does the etheses archive have all the Reed theses?

No! Adding your thesis is completely voluntary. Submissions do not replace the printed, bound thesis. If you are unsure about submitting, talk with your advisor.

I’m graduating soon. Does my thesis go into the etheses archive?

It is up to you! In the thesis submission form, you can choose whether or not to add your thesis to the etheses archive. Adding your thesis to the etheses archive is voluntary and is not a graduation requirement.

How do I save my document as a PDF?

What are accompanying materials and how do I submit them? How do I make a zip file?

You can submit supplemental files such as digital images, audio, data, and video files in addition to your thesis. They should be compressed into a separate, single zip file. You will need to create a zip file even if you are just submitting one single accompanying file. Instructions on making a zip file are below.

Mac: Highlight the file(s) you wish to zip, go to the File menu (or right-click) and select the option to “Compress” items. The zip file “Archive.zip” will appear in the same directory as the files you selected to compress.

Windows: Highlight the file(s) you wish to zip, right-click and select Send to>Compressed (zipped) folder. The zip file will appear in the same directory as the files you selected to compress.

What’s a copyright clearance statement?

If your thesis incorporates copyrighted material, (images, photographs, figures, data, illustrations, etc. not created by you), you’ll need to confirm that you have sought permission or are claiming fair use. For more information consult the Copyright Help for Theses guide or contact us for help.

Who can access the archive?

At present, access is limited to current Reed students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Log in with your Reed Kerberos credentials.

The archive may eventually become a public collection. Your thesis will not be made public unless you have given us permission to do so.

I submitted my thesis, but I don’t see it yet.

The library will load the theses as quickly as possible, but there will typically be some time between submission and access.

I submitted the wrong PDF, can I resubmit it?

You may resubmit your thesis, or make changes to the data you entered about your thesis, for 14 days after the date on which you uploaded your thesis to the archive. If you have any problems, please contact us at etheses@lists.reed.edu. If you wish to change the terms of access for your theses (e.g. from Reed-access-only to public, or vice versa), please email us.

I’m an alum, can I contribute my thesis to the archive?

Yes! If you graduated after 1992, you can submit your thesis through our Online Submission Portal. You will need to set up a Kerberos account to do so. Instructions on doing that are available on the Alumni Programs website.

If you graduated prior to 1992, please email a PDF copy of your thesis to etheses@groups.reed.edu. After receiving your thesis we will send you some brief questions to help us catalog your thesis in the archive.

I don’t have a PDF but I’m an alum. Can you digitize it for me?

Unfortunately, we cannot scan theses at this time. Please check back as we hope to reopen scanning requests soon.

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